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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, let me start by saying I drink tea. I have little, to no idea about the names, terns or what is/isn't possible on the coffee front.

My O/H, Miss Bolt On, does drink coffee and I'm thinking of getting her something from the coffee wormhole front for Christmas.

She's got a cafeteria and a moka pot(??? One of those mini kettle looking things) and uses ground coffee from a packet.

What's the next step/progression? Can I get a grinder and some beans or is there more to it?

I'm not about to stock the kitchen with a massive, bubbling, gurgling, steaming contraption, so think baby steps. I am happy to be educated in the lineage to the poor house though.

Thanks.

Sol.
 

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I guess the next 'easy' step is a worktop coffee machine such as a Nespresso or similar? I have a Tassimo which makes reasonable 'chain coffee shop' type drinks such as flat whites, cappacino's and lattes etc. Drinks cost around 50p a go which is a decent saving over a trip to coffee outlet, or an expensive fuss if you prefer instant ... seems the biggest thing with these type of machines now is the recyclable pods, or not.

Once you get into actual coffee machines it can get very expensive and labour intensive.
 

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I think a stovetop Moka pot is a great way to get good espresso, I guess a progression from that is beans (rather than ground) and a decent grinder (ceramic I think is the way to go).

Theres loads of small coffee companies online that will deliver interesting beans to experiment with
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess the next 'easy' step is a worktop coffee machine such as a Nespresso or similar? I have a Tassimo which makes reasonable 'chain coffee shop' type drinks such as flat whites, cappacino's and lattes etc. Drinks cost around 50p a go which is a decent saving over a trip to coffee outlet, or an expensive fuss if you prefer instant ... seems the biggest thing with these type of machines now is the recyclable pods, or not.

Once you get into actual coffee machines it can get very expensive and labour intensive.
I'd mentally dismissed the pods as a means to an end, rather than the next step. I was thinking of taking a (tiny) step down the whole beans route if possible.

I hear what you're saying on the expensive path 😱

I think a stovetop Moka pot is a great way to get good espresso, I guess a progression from that is beans (rather than ground) and a decent grinder (ceramic I think is the way to go).

Theres loads of small coffee companies online that will deliver interesting beans to experiment with
Is it as simple as that? Grind some beans and stick the powder in a Moka? There's no roasting, boiling, soaking involved?

If it's that simple, any recommendations for a decent grinder? Preferably a hand, non-electrical one. An electrical appliance is likely to sit in the cupboard.
 

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I'd mentally dismissed the pods as a means to an end, rather than the next step. I was thinking of taking a (tiny) step down the whole beans route if possible.

I hear what you're saying on the expensive path 😱



Is it as simple as that? Grind some beans and stick the powder in a Moka? There's no roasting, boiling, soaking involved?

If it's that simple, any recommendations for a decent grinder? Preferably a hand, non-electrical one. An electrical appliance is likely to sit in the cupboard.
Burr grinders are preferred over blade grinders. I wouldn't discount an electric one - manually grinding enough beans for the stove top or cafetiere on a daily basis might get a bit tiresome. I picked up a fancy KitchenAid one off evilbay a few years ago for £50 (no way could I justify the £200+ retail on one) - it has adjustable grind settings for espresso/stove top or cafetiere eetc. Ours often gets used multiple times a day. We usually stock up on big bags of Lavazza beans when it's on offer (£10-£12/kg) in the supermarket, and then get independent small batch as a treat.

EDIT:
Yes, buying pre-roasted beans makes it a doddle - just chuck them in the grinder and pop the output in the Moka/Cafetiere and go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Burr grinders are preferred over blade grinders. I wouldn't discount an electric one - manually grinding enough beans for the stove top or cafetiere on a daily basis might get a bit tiresome. I picked up a fancy KitchenAid one off evilbay a few years ago for £50 (no way could I justify the £200+ retail on one) - it has adjustable grind settings for espresso/stove top or cafetiere eetc. Ours often gets used multiple times a day. We usually stock up on big bags of Lavazza beans when it's on offer (£10-£12/kg) in the supermarket, and then get independent small batch as a treat.
Burr grinder.👍 A quick read seems to bring up a Hario as a decent, but affordable make. Any thoughts.

I didn't realise it took so long to grind. She only has one cup a day. Still a long of time?

There's a couple of coffee stockists within walking distance. 😊

EDIT:
Yes, buying pre-roasted beans makes it a doddle - just chuck them in the grinder and pop the output in the Moka/Cafetiere and go.
That's what I struggled to find online! I think the coffee websites are aimed at coffee drinkers, who already have an understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm with you on that.😁 Unfortunately, the O/H likes coffee.

Let's be honest, no one has ever gone into a shed, with a cup of coffee and built anything of note. Tea is where it's at.

Oh, completely off topic. Have you seen that property for sale in the middle of Hebden Bridge? The antiques place, with the mural garage door. Very cool.
 

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I'm with you on that.😁 Unfortunately, the O/H likes coffee.

Let's be honest, no one has ever gone into a shed, with a cup of coffee and built anything of note. Tea is where it's at.

Oh, completely off topic. Have you seen that property for sale in the middle of Hebden Bridge? The antiques place, with the mural garage door. Very cool.
yes mate i have - have you seen the price of it 😲😲
It looks amazing though although it used to be more amazing when it was the dirty old 'hole in the wall' pub
 

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Once you grind coffee bean they loose a lot of the aroma with day or two. Freshly ground is good next step.

Hand grinding is ‘fun’ but less so as a daily chore. If you are going with a course grind for a cafetière or filter then it’s less grinding effort than espresso which needs a very fine grind. Also one cup grind doesn’t take long but doing enough for a pot ……

Ideally get your beans from local roaster with a good turnover. The beans are at their best for a month or so after roasting. Alternatively someone like Starbucks does decent beans. Mega brand stuff from the supermarket is a bit of a gamble as it may have been roasted months ago (long expiry dates).

Burr grinder for consistency.
 

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You could try something from Melitta, you use ready ground coffee with paper filters (good for the environment). most models make as little or as much as you like and have a timer so it's ready when you get up, bit like a "teasmade" if you are as old as me you will know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Once you grind coffee bean they loose a lot of the aroma with day or two. Freshly ground is good next step.

Hand grinding is ‘fun’ but less so as a daily chore. If you are going with a course grind for a cafetière or filter then it’s less grinding effort than espresso which needs a very fine grind. Also one cup grind doesn’t take long but doing enough for a pot ……

Ideally get your beans from local roaster with a good turnover. The beans are at their best for a month or so after roasting. Alternatively someone like Starbucks does decent beans. Mega brand stuff from the supermarket is a bit of a gamble as it may have been roasted months ago (long expiry dates).

Burr grinder for consistency.
Thanks.😊

When grinding coffee beans, what sort of time is considered a long time?

You could try something from Melitta, you use ready ground coffee with paper filters (good for the environment). most models make as little or as much as you like and have a timer so it's ready when you get up, bit like a "teasmade" if you are as old as me you will know!
How lazy is your girlfriend ? I have a nespresso machine ,put a capsule in pull a lever and wait 20 seconds . Ideal if you don't want fuss/effort
Not the routes I'm looking at. Thanks though.
 

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Another tip, which my roaster reminded me of this morning when he delivered my 1kg of Costa Rica beans :)

It’s worth weighing the beans to get a consistent strength. Beans differ in density so weight is the best measure. 6grams per cup is a good starting point then adjust up or down to personal taste.

Also, to look over the edge of that rabbit hole…. Go look up James Hoffman on you tube :)

If she wants to try something other than the mokapot, then a cheap alternative is a V60 filter funnel. Again, James Hoffman has some good videos on the subject.
 

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Next step, IMHO is an espresso machine. Don’t arse about grinding your own beans, the faff gets real old real quick.

Something like a Gaggia Baby or Classico. You can pick up a secondhand one for not that much and they’re easily repaired as/when they play up.

We used a Classico for years, until going “bean to cup” early this year. Other than the occasional descale, it worked every day without fault.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Another tip, which my roaster reminded me of this morning when he delivered my 1kg of Costa Rica beans :)

It’s worth weighing the beans to get a consistent strength. Beans differ in density so weight is the best measure. 6grams per cup is a good starting point then adjust up or down to personal taste.

Also, to look over the edge of that rabbit hole…. Go look up James Hoffman on you tube :)

If she wants to try something other than the mokapot, then a cheap alternative is a V60 filter funnel. Again, James Hoffman has some good videos on the subject.
Someone else mentioned James Hoffman. I'm trying to watch without it being obvious, so my O/H doesn't cotton on.

Next step, IMHO is an espresso machine. Don’t arse about grinding your own beans, the faff gets real old real quick.

Something like a Gaggia Baby or Classico. You can pick up a secondhand one for not that much and they’re easily repaired as/when they play up.

We used a Classico for years, until going “bean to cup” early this year. Other than the occasional descale, it worked every day without fault.
It's baby steps, plus I don't want a big piece of kit, in case it sits in the cupboard, not being used. Plus, plus, it's a Christmas present, so I'd want to buy something new.

I may switch my attention to an electric grinder. Although I still can't pin anyone down to how long a long time is.

Plus, plus, plus, given all the tinkering you do, I would've had you down as a tea drinker.😁
 

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It's baby steps, plus I don't want a big piece of kit, in case it sits in the cupboard, not being used. Plus, plus, it's a Christmas present, so I'd want to buy something new.

Plus, plus, plus, given all the tinkering you do, I would've had you down as a tea drinker.😁
Makes sense. We bought a cheap espresso machine initially, just to see whether we’d use it or if it’d just be a fad. Turned out that it got used daily, so when it died we bought the better one.

I used to drink tea pretty much exclusively, but since getting a job where carrying fresh milk about to make a proper brew is a PITA, coffee has largely taken over.

Best of luck, whatever you choose. 👍😃
 

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Someone else mentioned James Hoffman. I'm trying to watch without it being obvious, so my O/H doesn't cotton on.

I may switch my attention to an electric grinder. Although I still can't pin anyone down to how long a long time is.
Time is a bit elastic. The finer the grind, the longer it takes. For example, My electric grinder take around 30sec to grind 54grams of beans to mid grind setting. Espresso grind is roughly the same for half the weight of beans. Hand grinder is probably going to take 3 or 4 times longer, at a guess, which is okay for a small amount or coarse grind. I had a hand grinder many years ago but it was too much effort for espresso fine grind so I’ve used electric for 20yrs.

Many cheaper grinders (& some mid price), cannot grind fine enough for espresso.

If you get a grinder then you can chuck in a V60 filter holder (plastic ones are fine) & a packet of V60 filter papers. Just another brewing method that give a different result to the moka pot. James has a video on V60 brewing technique, but no need to go all geeky about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks.😊

It looks like around three minutes of grinding for a cup. The way everyone has been going on I thought it was going to be 10-15 minutes! Granted, it's not stick a teabag in a cup and scratch your nose for a minute, but it's not the end of the world.😁

After the advice on here and elsewhere I've thinking of:

Buy a Hario Skelton manual grinder, but have a look for decent, ceramic burr electric one first.

Use the Moka pot we already have.

If anyone wants to throw in some coffee grinder suggestions, I'm open to them.
 
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