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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a quick look in the SSP catalogue I've come to realise that these things on my front axles are for adjusting it:



Yay!

Okay, now for the dumb-ass newbie questions:

What do they adjust? Am I right in thinking that I can use them to raise/lower the front end and make the ride more/less harsh?

Whatever they are for, how do I use them?

I would actually like to raise my car up a little at the moment because as it stands I have to drive it onto planks to get a jack under it. Raising it half an inch would make life a lot easier.

I've also noticed that the front tyres have significantly more wear on the insides than on the outsides. I'm guessing that this is because the car has been lowered (by a previous owner) without giving much consideration to other factors, and that raising it up a bit will also help with that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for that.

I see that at the end of that thread. Laurence Fletcher says that the car can be raised up by:

Jack up the front of the car & support on axle stands under the suspension beam, allowing the wheels to drop, (disconnect the shocker from the bottom trailing arm to allow it to drop as far as it will go), to completely unload the torsion bars.
Slacken the locking nuts on the centre grubscrews.
Now screw-in the adjuster screws the same amount on both top & bottom torsion bars. (The adjuster screw is the longer one which pushes the aluminium block up).
Lower the car to the ground to see the result of your adjustment, and when you are happy, tighten up the locknuts and refit shock absorbers.
If previous owner used "lowered" shock absorbers, they may not have enough travel for your new height setting, so check that nothing is bottoming-out by bouncing the car a bit before you drive it.
1. The "adjuster screws" that Laurence refers to are the second one down, and the bottom one in my picture. What are the others for?

2. Will this help with the type wear problem that I describe or do I need to be looking at something else for that?
 

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No idea about the wear problem, but the other screws on each adjuster screw into the bit inside the beam that actualy holds the leaves in place.. Not sure what it's called I'm afraid. Loosen them off a tad to allow weverything to move more freely while you adjust with the lower adjusting screws, then just make sure it's done up tight when you've got your hight dialed in:hangloose


EDIT: It's generaly accepted (though I'm no expert) that you should have your tracking etc re-done when you adjust your suspension, this may help your unusual wear problem too if you're lucky:)
 

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1. The "adjuster screws" that Laurence refers to are the second one down, and the bottom one in my picture. What are the others for
?

They "connect" the adjuster on the outside to the rotating block on the inside of the tube that turns the torsion leaves as you wind the height up or down. You will have to loosen the nut on those screws by half a turn or so before you adjust, and tighten them back up afterwards. Use an allen key to hold the central screw, you don't want to loosen that one. Hold it tight whilst you slacken / tighten the locknut on it.

2. Will this help with the type wear problem that I describe or do I need to be looking at something else for that?
Maybe. Whatever you do, you need to get your tracking checked after any suspension adjustment. Get it to the height you want it, then go and get the tracking set.

Dave.
 
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